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Can You Really Tell Apart These Commonly Confused Words?

 When two words are very similar in terms of spelling, pronunciation or meaning, things can get really confusing, especially in a language with such a vast lexicon as English. The result is a whole assortment of easily confused couples and trios of words that are commonly misused, misspelled and misunderstood. Only the most well-read and self-educated manage to tell apart these confusing words and know which words to use in which context, so the real question is, are you among the best? Find out by completing each of the following stories with the fitting word.
they're
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Their" is the possessive form of the pronoun “they”: "There" points to a place. "They’re" is a contraction of the word combination “they are”.
Their
There
They’re
its
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"It’s" is a contraction of “it is”, whereas "its", without the apostrophe, is a possessive pronoun pointing to a relationship of belonging to something.
It’s
Its
breath
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Breathe" is a verb, "breath" is a noun.
Breath
Breathe
principal
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
The word "principal" can either be a noun, or an adjective. In the noun form, it denotes a person who is in charge of an organization (typically, a school). The adjective form means "the key, the most important". The noun "principle", on the other hand, means a set belief or ideal.
Principal
Principle
historic
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Historic" is synonymous to famous, influential or important, whereas "historical" refers to something related to history.
Historic
Historical
Capitol
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Capital" can be a noun or adjective that means a number of things, like the uppercase letters or the main city in a country, "Capitol", on the other hand, is a legislative building. When starting with a capital letter, "Capitol" denotes the home of the United States Congress.
Capitol
capitol
capital
Sight
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
“Sight” means something seen, like a view. “Site” is a piece of land that has a specific use. “Cite” is a verb that means “to present the source of information”.
Sight
Site
Cite
Infer
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
“Imply” is synonymous to “hint”, whereas “Infer” is synonymous to “deduce”.
Infer
Imply
Complement
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
A "compliment" is something nice you say to a person, flattery, whereas a "complement" is something that completes something.
Complement
Compliment
Among
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
“Among” refers to a collective group of something, whereas “between” points to a relationship between two or more things.
Among
Between
Further
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Farther" is used to refer to physical distance, while "further" denotes a more abstract kind of distance.
Further
Farther
Sympathy
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Empathy" is the ability to understand others' emotions, and "sympathy" is feeling compassionate towards other people's sorrow.
Sympathy
Empathy
Flaunt
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Flout" means to defy and "flaunt" means to show off.
Flaunt
Flout
Effect
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
"Effect" is a noun meaning the result, whereas "affect" is a verb that means to have a negative result on something.
Effect
Affect
Ensure
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
To “assure” someone means to tell them something is true. “Ensure” is synonymous to “guarantee” or “make sure”. Finally, “insure” refers to the action of issuing an insurance policy.
Ensure
Assure
Insure
Better Luck Next Time!
bad
 
Unfortunately, you've failed this quiz, but we don't blame you, as this was a really tough one. There's a reason why these words are believed to be confusing, after all. Still, we say try again, or at least look into the correct answers where we explain the use of these words.
You're in the Sweet Middle!
medium
 
Your responses were varied. You managed to answer about half the questions correctly, which means that your command of the English language and some of its most confusing words is quite impressive, but you still have some things to learn.
Very Impressive!
good
 
You truly are among the best, as far as your command of the English language goes. You were able to answer most, if not all, of our tricky questions right, and you really know your way around some of the most confusing words in English. Excellent job!
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