header print

Tell Apart These Commonly Confused Words (Part 2)

Edited By: Natalia Jones
 English spelling can be really chaotic and confusing, as some words are just too alike. Take ‘gaff’ and ‘gaffe’, which are pronounced the same, but the former is a type of weapon, whereas the latter is a social misstep, a faux pas, if you will. In fact, entire lists of commonly confused English words exist, and those were created for a reason, as many people do, in fact, find it difficult to know which of the two or even three words to use in which sentence. Are you among those people? Or can you succeed at picking the right word every time? This quiz seems easy, as all you have to do is to fill in the blank in 15 sentences, but beware, appearances are deceiving, and to win this quiz, you need both a deep knowledge of the English language and a keen eye for detail.
desert dessert
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
The 'desert' is a dry sandy place, whereas 'dessert' is the last, typically sweet, course of a meal.
Desert
Dessert
i.e. e.g.
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'e.g.' means 'for example' and 'i.e.' means 'that is'.
i.e.
e.g.
Everyday Every day
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'Every day' can be an adjective and a noun, whereas 'everyday' is just an adjective and it means that something is common, ordinary or routine.
Every day
Everyday
By, Buy, Bye
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'By' is a preposition denoting proximity to a location, belonging, method etc. To 'buy' means to purchase, and 'bye' means farewell.
Buy
By
Bye
Lead/Led Lead
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'Led' is the past tense of the verb 'to lead' synonymous to show or guide, and 'lead', the noun, is a poisonous metal.
Lead (verb)
Led
Lead (noun)
Advice/Advise
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
Though the meaning of these 2 words is nearly the same, 'advice' is a noun, and 'to advise' is a verb.
Advice
Advise
Dragged and drug
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'Drug' refers to a chemical substance or the process of administering it, but 'dragged' is the past tense of the verb 'to drag'.
Drug
Dragged
Climactic Climatic
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'Climactic' is related to or resulting in a climax, and 'climatic' refers to something related to the climate.
Climactic
Climatic
Attribute and contribute
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'Contribute' is a verb that means to give in order to help achieve or provide something, and to 'attribute' means to regard something as being caused by (someone or something).
Attributed
Contributed
Consequently and subsequently
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'Consequently' requires a cause-effect relationship, whereas 'subsequently' doesn't, it only shows the order in which 2 events happened.
Consequently
Subsequently
Precede and proceed
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'To proceed' means to continue, and 'to precede' refers to something that happened before something else in time.
Precedes
Proceeds
continuous continual
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'Continuous' requires a non-stop event, one without interruption, whereas 'continual' is synonymous to recurrent, repeated and frequent.
Continuously
Continually
Regiment Regimen
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
Regiment: a large unit of soldiers. Regimen: a diet or regular exercise plan.
Regiment
Regimen
Allude and elude
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
'To allude to' means to reference something else indirectly, while 'to elude' means to avoid.
Allude
Elude
Assume and presume
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
You must have evidence to presume something, but you don't need any to assume it.
Assume
Presume
Peak, peek, and pique
 
 
Fill the gap with the word that fits the most.
Peak, peek, and pique: The ‘peak’ refers to the top or maximum of something. The word ‘peek’ is a verb meaning to sneak a look at something. Lastly, ‘pique’ as a noun is a sudden anger or annoyance, but as a verb, it can both mean ‘to anger someone’ and ‘to raise someone’s curiosity’.
Peak
Peek
Pique
Try Again
bad
 
You tried your best, but unfortunately, you didn't manage to answer most questions correctly. But don't get upset and try to make the most out of the situation: turn this quiz into an educational moment. You already learned a lot while taking this quiz, but you can learn even more by looking at the correct answers.
Good job!
good
 
Your answers were predominantly correct, but you still had a few holes here and there. Are you ready to give this quiz another try and learn even more about the English vocabulary?
We have a winner!
excellent
 
You definitely know more about the English vocabulary than the average Joe, as nearly all, if not all of your answer were right on target! You should be proud of your deep knowledge and attention to detail!
Sign Up Free
Did you mean:
By clicking "Join", you agree to our Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy
Sign Up Free
Did you mean:
By clicking "Join", you agree to our Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy