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9 Things Your Body Does That Are Defense Mechanisms

 There are some fascinating defense mechanisms our bodies activate that may seem a little strange, however they all have important roles in protecting our health 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Take a look:
 
 
Yawning
defense mechanisms
It's main purpose is to cool the brain down after it's been overheated or overloaded. 
Hiccups
Hiccups occur when we tend to eat quickly, swallow large pieces of food or overeat, which may irritate our pneumogastric nerve, resulting in hiccups. 
Sneezing
defense mechanisms
Sneezing occurs when our nasal passages fill with too many allergens, microbes, dust or other irritants. Sneezing helps us get rid of them.
Myoclonic Jerks
This usually occurs when you drift off to sleep and your body jolts for a second. In this moment your muscles spasm strongly, causing you to awake instantly. When you fall asleep, the frequency of your breathing rapidly falls and your pulse slows down slightly, relaxing your muscles. Your brain may interpret this as a heralding death, thus causing your body to jolt in order to save you.
Stretching
defense mechanisms
We instinctively stretch to prepare our bodies for the physical loads we expect to take on during the day. Stretching also works the muscles, restores blood flow and improves our mood. 
 
Wrinkling of the skin
Wrinkles that appear on your skin and hands after a shower play a fundamental role. When your body encounters an increased amount of moisture it understands that the environment around you may be slippery. Your skin therefore begins to form wrinkles in order to have a better grip on smooth surfaces. 
Goosebumps
defense mechanisms
Goosebumps reduce the amount of heat our bodies lose through the pores of our skin, making it easier to keep ourselves warm. 
Loss of memory
Memory loss tends to occur after the most unpleasant experiences, whereby our brains literally delete terrible moments from our memories. 
Tears
defense mechanisms
Tears act as a protection for the mucous membrane of our eye when a foreign object comes into contact with it. Scientists also believe that in stressful situations the body creates a new, powerful source of irritation in order to distract a person from the pain they are currently experiencing. 
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