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A  Guide to Teas From Around the World

Tea is a drink enjoyed around the world. Each country has its own spin on this delicious drink, drank through the centuries. Some locals add sweeteners or milk. Some are drunk in the summer, while others suit the winter. Some go with meals and others are perfect on their own. I would like to try all of these interesting blends. Here are some of the differnet teas they drink in various countries around the world, each having its own special blend.

Argentina: Yerba Mate

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A green tea packed with vitamins, widely drunk throughout South America. Customarily this is a shared drink, being passed around in company. The drink’s consistency is a lot less watery than most teas and has a smoky, bitter flavor. 

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Britain: Ceylon and Earl Grey Black Tea

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Tea is synonymous with British culture although it only came on the scene in the 17th century. Today the British are the largest per capita consumers of tea. The popular variant is black tea, with milk, or sugar added. 
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India: Masala Chai

Black tea with milk is widely drunk throughout India, thanks to the British colonial rule. The country also boasts many local variations, including Masala Chai, a blend of black tea with local spices and herbs, brewed directly in milk.
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Mongolia: Suutei Tsai

A savory drink, this thick beverage features water, milk, tea and salt as ingredients. Served in little bowls you will find this drink served with all meals in Mongolia. 

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Japan: Matcha

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This finely powdered green tea boasts many health benefits. It also plays a central role in a traditional Japanese tea ceremony. The leaves of the plant are stone-ground, and the powder is also sometimes used as an ingredient in cooking. 

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Morocco: Mint Tea

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This unique brew includes mint leaves immersed in a green tea, with blocks of sugar added. Traditionally this tea is prepared by the head of the household and drunk during as well as after meals. This blend of tea is enjoyed by people across Morocco and much of North Africa.  
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Russia: Strong Black Tea

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A samovar, a multi-chamber pot is used in a two step brewing process. First the black tea concentrate is made from dry leaves, and then each tea drinker adds hot water into his, or her cup. Russian custom is to brew quite strong tea. A podstakannik, a special cup that holds the glass cup, is used for drinking tea.
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South Africa: Rooibos

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Also known as red bush tea, this drink is made from the indigenous Fynbos plant and is well known for its bright red coloring. The naturally sweet drink is usually not drunk with sugar or milk, although some locals add honey or lemon for added flavor. 
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Hong Kong: Iced Milk Tea

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This local drink is a blend of black tea and evaporated or condense milk, served over ice. Since the filter resembles a pantyhose bag and the color is similar to nude stockings, the tea has earned the nickname “pantyhose tea”, or sometimes “silk stocking tea”.
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Turkey: Cay

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This local black tea is brewed with a two chamber pot and drunk without milk. A ubiquitous drink, cay accompanies all meals and is also drunk throughout the day. The beverage is served in small glasses, enjoyed hot and is sweetened with sugar cubes. 

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USA: Sweet Ice Tea

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A specialty served in southern states, this drink is infused with black tea, sugar and sometimes lemon. Canned and bottled variants are found throughout the country, but locals enjoy mixing fresh pitchers to counter a hot summer’s day.
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Taiwan: Bubble Tea

This popular drink can be spotted all over the world. This cold milk tea is shaken until frothy, poured over chewy tapioca pearls cooked in sugar syrup, producing a sweet taste. Modern variations include fruit based teas.
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Egypt: Sweetened Black Tea

A very popular pastime, local tea drinkers enjoy several cups of black tea a day and are known to drink from small glasses and add plenty sweeteners. At weddings, a specialty tea made from hibiscus is used to toast the occasion. 
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Tibet: Butter Tea

In Tibet butter tea is known as “po cha” and is made from yak butter, tea leaves, salt, and water. This bitter drink is served in bowls and rich in caloric energy. 
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