Health Myth or Fact?

 Due to the fact that we’re all exposed, almost daily, to various health facts many of us see ourselves as unqualified experts on the human body. Some of us even advise others on what to do in various health cases based on this knowledge, but is something passed on from one person to another actual truth? To answer this question, the next quiz will test your knowledge of general health issues and examine whether you can distinguish between "facts" we have all heard and truths that have been scientifically researched and established. Good luck!
different types of chocolate
 
 
Eating chocolate causes pimples
After several studies were conducted, no direct link was found between eating chocolate and the appearance of pimples.
True
False
A bottle of natural spray deodorant
 
 
Spraying / applying deodorant to the armpit contributes to the development of breast cancer
Because of the proximity of the armpits to the breasts, it has been suggested that using deodorant causes the development of breast cancer because of the absorption of components into the breast tissue, but this is not true.
True
False
Two hands holding two ice cream cones
 
 
Eating ice cream worsens a cold
There is a widespread belief that eating dairy products, such as ice cream, increases production of phlegm and makes it difficult to recover from a cold, but this is not true.
True
False
Woman standing in nature
 
 
Staying in a place with cold weather conditions causes a cold
While wearing short clothing in cold weather is unpleasant, bacteria are what cause colds and not cold weather.
True
False
Fried egg in a pan with a heart shaped cutter on it
 
 
Eating 1-2 eggs a day does not increase the risk of heart disease
For many years, people believed that the cholesterol in egg yolk increases the risk of heart disease, but after 40 years of extensive research, it was found that eating 1-2 eggs a day not only does not increase the risk of heart disease, but actually reduces it.
True
False
A man cracking his fingers
Jaysin Trevino
 
 
Cracking fingers doesn’t lead to arthritis
The sound that comes out of our fingers when we crack them is of gasses releasing and is not a precursor to the development of arthritis.
True
False
A man styling a woman's hair
 
 
Hair and nails stop growing after death
Post mortem, the skin dries up and shrinks, causing the hair and nails of the human body to appear longer than they were during burial.
True
False
Woman swimming in pool
 
 
Swimming after eating can harm the body
This myth comes from the fear of muscle contraction after eating and concentration of blood in the stomach, but you can swim a few minutes after eating without worry.
True
False
A glass of water on a wood table
 
 
Everyone must drink at least 8 glasses of water a day to stay healthy
Water is an important source of liquids, but it is not necessary to drink a certain amount of water a day, rather sip it when you feel thirsty.
True
False
A table with food and drinks
 
 
Eating food before drinking reduces the severity of the hangover
Eating before drinking alcohol causes slower absorption of alcohol into the bloodstream, leading to fewer headaches the day after.
True
False
An open jar with brown sugar
 
 
Brown sugar is healthier than white sugar
The brown color of the sugar comes from a substance called "molasses" that remains during its processing, but it is also not significantly different in terms of dietary composition compared to white sugar.
True
False
A boy sitting in front of a t.v
 
 
Sitting too close to the TV leads to eye damage and deterioration of vision
The TVs that are manufactured today are safer than in the past, and apart from pain in the eyes due to fatigue, sitting in front of one will not cause damage or deterioration of vision.
True
False
Woman blowing her nose
 
 
Green mucus during illness indicates infection
There is no connection between the color of phlegm and physical condition during illness.
True
False
Man doing push ups on a boardwalk
 
 
Regularly stopping exercise will cause your muscles to turn to fat
Fat tissue and muscle tissue are two different things, and stopping exercise does not result in a conversion of one to another, but does increase fat and body mass.
True
False
two Styrofoam cups on a beach
 
 
The use of disposable cups, utensils, and plates can cause cancer
Styrofoam disposables may contain formaldehyde and styrene, both of which have been declared by the World Health Organization as part of the list of carcinogenic substances to humans.
True
False
Lab equipment
Hit the medical journals...
You answered most of the questions incorrectly, which is probably due to the fact that you’ve heard health myths throughout your life and like many of us, you also believed them. To debunk some of these health myths, you may want to try retake this quiz to learn new things. Also if there are things which remain unclear turn to knowledgeable sources rather than believing pieces of information circulating around you.
thumbs up
You know how to distinguish between myths and facts
You knew the correct answers to most of the questions, which means you can filter most of the information people give you about health. However, there are some myths you believe, and you’d benefit more if you continue to listen to experts instead of unauthorized health professionals to live a healthy and enjoyable life.
Doctor holding a medical file
Have you considered becoming a doctor?
Well done! You've been able to identify most of the known myths about human health successfully, and you'd rather listen to experts than people who give you occasional advice. Apparently, this topic interests you and maybe you could even be an expert in the field yourself. Keep filtering out the myths that people sometimes tell so you can enjoy robust health and give your body exactly what it needs.
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