What Do You Remember of English?

 How much do you remember from your high school days, sitting and listening to your teacher talk about similes, metaphors, famous works and expanding your vocabulary? This quiz is going to test you on exactly that.
 
 
Is this sentence in active or passive voice? "The event was held by a talkshow host."
Active
Passive
 
 
Complete this sentence: "I got some food for ______ wants some."
In this case, the object isn't just one word. It's the whole subordinate phrase "whoever wants some," and in that phrase, "whoever" is the subject. The word's role in the subordinate clause takes priority over the larger independent clause.
Whoever
Whomever
 
 
Which of the following best illustrates an 'anaphora'?
It ended with bigger smiles. It ended with grins.
Their stomachs were nearly as empty as their bags at the end of the trip.
They ended the trip with emptier stomachs and hearts.
The voyage was a breath of fresh air.
 
 
A comparison between two objects without using "like" or "as" is a....
Metaphor
Similie
Personification
Alliteration
 
 
Who wrote The Catcher in the Rye?
It was published in 1951.
John Steinbeck
J.D. Salinger
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Ray Bradbury
 
 
Which of the following is a character from Shakespeare's play 'Much A-Do About Nothing'?
Beatrice
Horatio
Murcatio
Ophelia
 
 
How would you describe a narrator who knows everyone's thoughts but isn't a part of the story?
Third person omniscient
First person
Unreliable narrator
Second person
 
 
"Polly Pocket picked a purple plant" is an example of...
Alliteration
Contrast
Simile
Metaphor
 
 
"And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true." - What literary device does this quote by Tennyson exemplify?
An oxymoron is a rhetorical device that uses an ostensible self-contradiction to illustrate a rhetorical point or to reveal a paradox.
Fallacy
Parallelism
Hyperbole
Oxymoron
 
 
The story of George Orwell's Animal Farm is an allegory for what historical period?
The Second World War
The Rise of Soviet Russia
The Great Depression
The Middle Ages
 
 
When something is ductile, it means it is...
easily malleable
used to dig ducts
similar in shape to tears
sticky on both sides
 
 
The contrast between what happens and what was expected is called...
Situational irony
Dramatic irony
Verbal irony
Sinister irony
 
 
"Buzz" and "BAM!" are examples of...
Onomatopoeia
Allegories
Allusions
Alliteration
 
One Star... Try Again?
Unfortunately you didn't get a high score. English is a complicated language with an incredible history. One does not need too much about it to use it well or indeed even write the best novel ever written. If you'd like you can try again. Alternatively, check your mistakes, the answers and some additional information by clicking on 'Show Mistakes'.
 
THREE STARS
You have answered a goodly number of questions correctly and have achieved a higher-than-average level of knowledge about the actual language you use every day. It's amazing how little most of us know about it. Good for you! If you'd like to know where you went wrong, click on 'Show Mistakes'.
 
FIVE STARS!
My my, aren't we brilliant? You've trashed our quiz and made us look like amateurs! Oh well, we congratulate you, with nary a muttered complaint, on your incredibly impressive knowledge of the English language. Keep it up and share your results with others!
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