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Could There Be Treasure Hiding in Your Attic?

 If you're anything like me, then the contents of your attic or basement probably look a lot more like an unsightly pile of debris than an orderly stash of infrequently-used belongings. However, after finding out how much some of these possessions could be worth, you may be inspired to sort through all of the junk you've collected over the years, just in case you're unwittingly sitting on a gold mine. Have you got any of the 12 valuable items listed below lying around in your attic?
 
 
1. Football Programs
Early Harvard vs. Yale sports paraphernalia are extremely collectible and rare. That's why programs like the ones seen above can often fetch quite a tidy sum, depending on their condition.
Estimated value: $700
2. Soda Crates

At the turn of the 20th Century, the booming soda industry consisted of a number of local drugstores that mixed and bottled small batches of soda, before delivering them in hand-stenciled crates. Crates from the 1950s or 1960s usually sell for around $20 each, however, older ones can fetch quite a lot more.

Estimated value: up to $200

3. Dollhouses

In 1924, the British toy company, Lines Bros, released this massive dollhouse, which is almost 6 feet wide. It features miniature versions of then-contemporary stucco walls, mullioned glass windows, and floral wallpaper.

Estimated value: $2000

4. Belly Boards

These boards were invented in the 1960s by the same person who went on to eventually design Ugg boots. These particular boards are known as 'Paipos,' which comes from the Hawaiian word 'Pae Poo,' meaning 'headfirst.'

Estimated value: $500

5. Ball Jugs

In the 1940s, Anchor Hocking sold these unique jugs in very limited quantities. Since then, they've become one of the world's most coveted sources of jadeite.

Estimated value: $400 (whole), $150 (damaged)

6. Lounge Chairs

If you've got a set of lounge chairs that look exactly like this one, then you're in for a pleasant surprise. They were designed by Milo Baughman, a modern design pioneer, whose midcentury-modern classics are still in heavy demand today.

Estimated value: $1500 for a full set

 
7. Dining Chairs

These English oak dining chairs are quite a rare find. With their barley twisted legs and original leather seats, they're considered to be the epitome of the Gothic Revival period.

Estimated value: $600 for a full set

8. Sterling Silver Belt Buckles

If you've got a belt with a buckle that has 'R. Schaezlein & Son' marked on it, then you may have hit the jackpot since that's the name of a famous San Francisco silversmith that was opened in 1882.

Estimated value: $500

9. 1960s Stetson Hats

The first-ever cowboy hat was created in 1865 by John Batterson Stetson. While very few 19th-century ones still exist in good condition, ones from the 1960s or earlier still hold quite a good amount of value.

Estimated value: $175

10. Loving Cups

These quirky cups were designed for two people to share a celebratory drink together and were usually used at banquets or weddings. If they're made purely out of solid silver and animal horns, then they'll probably fetch quite a tidy sum.

Estimated value: $700

11. Hooked Rugs

Some early 20th-century rugs were created using a method known as hand-hooking, which basically meant that scraps of fabric were pulled through a burlap backing by means of a sailor's hook. It is this unique and rarely-used manufacturing process which truly gives these rugs their great value.

Estimated value: $750

12. Trunks

Back in the 19th Century, luggage had to withstand long and arduous journeys by wagon, and that's why they used to make them so sturdy. If you've got one that comes with multiple interior compartments and lithographed paper lining, then you might want to take it in to be valued.

Estimated value: $700


If you know anyone who might have any of these treasures hidden away in their attic, then don't forget to share it with them.

 

Source: countryliving
Images: pinterest
Cover Image: depositphotos

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