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The Best of Macro Photography

 Beauty, grace, and love are all in the details, and you can take a really detailed look at the world around you with these incredible macro photos. Everyday things, like snowflakes, water droplets, insects and even microscopic creatures look like real works of art through the lens of these talented photographers. Explore our favorite close-up photos throughout the years with this extensive collection of macro photography.
Proving once again that the world can become a much more colorful and interesting place when you take the time to look closely, these macro photos take us to a world hidden within ours, that we see every day and yet never really take time to properly notice and appreciate.
 
An incredibly talented macro photographer, Miki Asai is one of a few people to follow ants around, exploring with them a miniature world of water drops, stones, and flowers, most of it within her own garden. She doesn't try to control the elements she photographs but finds beautiful miniature scenes that happen naturally. 
 
We often look up to the stars or down into the depth of the ocean to see worlds that are foreign and alien to us, but there are many strange worlds hiding right under our nose. With the right equipment, a person can peer into these familiar-yet-alien worlds and see sights that feel like they’re out of this world.
 
The art of taking close-up photos has tremendously improved with the introduction of digital cameras. The picture-enhancing features, combined with the ability to check your work instantaneously have made taking the perfect image much easier, and luckily for us – we get to enjoy these incredible shots we may not have been able to see before.
 
Macro photography, the art of photographing very small objects, is made beautiful in this photos series, with some truly stunning and mesmerizing shots from the viewpoint of a tiny creature. Beauty can be found in the oddest of places and it's amazing how things that look ordinary to us can become very beautiful when looked at closely.
 
This competition has been running for 42 years, and over 2,000 people from 70 different countries decided to take part this year. For the uninitiated, photomicrography involves taking a photograph through a magnifying device (such as a microscope) in order to capture the minute details of things that are invisible to the naked eye.
 
A stunning world, which we find hard to see with the naked eye, or fail to notice due to the hustle and bustle of our every day lives, is hiding right under our noses. Nowadays, thanks to a huge improvement in photographic technology, we are able to acknowledge and admire this beautiful world. Below is a selection of wonderful close-up photos that reveal the weird and wonderful world that exists under our feet.
 
 
Scottish photographer Jimmy Reid specializes in macro photography. In this photography collection, he has taken portraits of insects, allowing you to connect more intimately with them. Take a look at these beautiful creatures below - from horseflies to ladybirds, whether you love them or hate them after looking through this series, there is no denying the beauty of these insects.
 
The Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition is in its 45th year now, zooming in on some of the tiniest living (and non-living) objects of our world. From a tiny alligator getting his nervous system to the smallest snowflake, more than 2000 photos were submitted from 100 countries. Here are 16 images that made it to the finals, including the winners themselves. Feast your eyes on some of the best macro-photography in all the land.
 
An arthropod is a type of animal that has its skeleton on the outside of the body (external exoskeleton), a body divided into segments, and jointed appendages. These include all insects, arachnids (spiders) and crustaceans. Each segment of their bodies repeats and has a pair of limbs. They are one of the most species-rich members on earth, due to their high level of versatility and adjustment.
 
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