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16 Things in Your Home You Never Knew Were Termed

I've always known that English vocabulary is complex, but I never knew I was missing out on some important terms that are useful for describing certain details around the house. Finding out what they are got me thinking about the complexities of our living space, and that there are some surprising intentions behind each one of them regardless of whether they were created with design or function in mind. 

Challenge yourself: Can you name the following home objects and areas before we surprise you with the term?

 
 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

MUNTIN

This term describes the strips of wood or metal that divide a window into different panes. In the UK, though, you are more likely to hear 'glazing bars' instead.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names
Original image source: Jeremy Levine / Flickr

CLERESTORY

This is the term that refers to windows that are positioned above eye level. You would often find these in basements. "Clerestory" is also used to refer to the tall, majestic windows found at steep heights in Romanesque and Gothic churches. 

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

FIREPLACE CHEEKS

These are the splayed sides of the firebox in your fireplace - the central area where the fire is burnt.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

KITE WINDER

Did you know there's also a name for the 90-degree turn in your staircase? The "kite winder" refers to the middle point of the 3 wedged steps that make this turn possible.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names
Original image source: Mike Tewkesbury / Flickr

OEIL-DE-BOEUF

This type of window is normally oval-shaped, and is placed in upper levels in houses. It is often seen in Colonial-style architecture in America and it is also referred to as an 'ox-eye window'.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

INGLENOOK

This is the term describing the space on either side of the fireplace that makes for some comfortable sitting areas. This is a feature you are most likely to see this in large fireplaces.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

ESCUTCHEON

This is what we call the decorative or protective plate of metal commonly found around door knobs or keyholes. The word can also be used to describe a coat of arms.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names
Original image source: Mark Doliner / Flickr

SCUTTLE

If you've ever wondered what the name for the ceiling opening that leads to the attic of the house is, here you have it. The scuttle is the type of door found in attics that normally requires a ladder to climb through.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

POP-UP DRAIN

This is the part of your bathroom sink that allows you to fill up a basin with water with just one push or pull of a lever.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

ENFILADE

You have this in your house if you have a series of doorways in line with one another. In more simple terms, this refers to a long corridor with multiple subsequent rooms on its sides.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

NAP

The term used to describe the soft side of a rug, or any type of fabric, such as velvet. This could also be a great place to take a nap!

 


 

16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

WELTING

The lining found at the seams of upholstered furniture also has a name. "Welting" can sometimes be found in a contrasting decorative color or in the same color as the upholstery's fabric.  

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

ANTIMACASSAR

This refers to the unattached piece of fabric placed over the backs or arms of chairs and sofas, to prevent them from getting dirty. "Antimacassar" is also the name given to the piece of fabric placed on airplane or train seats.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

ARCHITRAVE

The word that describes the beam resting on top of two column, often seen in Classical architecture. In the home, this simply refers to the molding above a door frame.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

CAMBRIC

This is the part of your couch you've probably never seen. It refers to the fabric found on the underside of upholstered furniture, and is considered to be an important part of sofa construction.

 


 

 
16 Home Objects You Never Knew Actually Had Names

RUNNING BOND

This is the term used for the type of tile design that resembles the way bricks are stacked in a wall. It is a pattern in which tiles are placed in an offset positioning in each row, and is commonly found in bathrooms and kitchens.

 

 

H/T: goodhousekeeping.com  

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