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Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation

The wildlife is all about interactions between living things. Some species interact with each other in hunting, in fighting for territory, and in other acts that evolve out of rivalry. However, there are some surprising species interactions, which on the contrary, have some good intentions. Some animals team up in order to benefit from the specializations they each have and help each other search for prey, creating a symbiotic relationship that is truly fascinating.

1. Ravens Guide Wolves to Prey
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
Wolves could definitely use the birds-eye view of the raven to look for prey. This is in fact the smart cooperative tactic these two species use. During winter, the raven points out the prey's location to the wolf by landing near it and croaking in order to get the wolf's attention. The raven later benefits from this by feasting on the remaining meat left over by the wolf, since wolves tend to move away from their kill after they've eaten their fill.

2. Carrion Beetles and Their Mite Minions
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
Carrion beetles are very much attracted to newly deceased and decomposing animals. There are two main reasons for this, that keeps their nature thriving: They lay their eggs in the dead animal so as to provide their larvae enough meat to survive, and they feed on larvae of other species that are also competing for space in the same carcass. Sometimes, the competition is too abundant for the carrion beetles to destroy all the rivals on their own. In order to both help and benefit from this, mites decide to take a free ride on the beetle's backs to join them in force. It's also said that the mites may even clean bacteria from the beetles themselves during this act.

3. Daniel Greene and His Seizure Snake
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
Daniel Greene, who suffers from grand mal seizures, uses an unconventional service animal that has apparently become extremely vital to his life. He carries a 5-foot-long boa constrictor, called Bedrock, around his neck. The snake notices whenever a seizure would be coming on, at which point it would stiffen and squeeze his neck slightly to help its owner. Bedrock is also essential for giving enough warning for Daniel to de-stress and take medication in due time, so as to prevent the seizure and treat it safely. 

4. Badgers and Coyotes Team Up
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
With their different capabilities and one common prey, the coyote and the badger can make a great team for hunting down rodents. While the badger can dig holes in the ground in search for rodents in their burrows, the coyote can run fast enough to chase them down. If in any case the rodents escape back into the ground, it's the badger's job to do the digging. This cooperative effort is normally found between lone coyotes and one badger, rather than in groups. 


5. Frogs Protect Spider Eggs For Shelter
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
The Colombian Lesserblack tarantula and the dotted humming frog can easily be rivals. However, they've become loyal friends ever since they discovered what they can do for each other. These two animal species have been spotted sharing burrow created by the spider. The frog is happy to feed on the small invertebrates that are attracted to the remains of the spider's kills, while the spider spares some shelter for the frog to protect it from its predators, which wouldn't dare enter the burrow of a large hunting spider. In order to let the frog in, the spider needs to pick it up, examine it, and immediately release it when it senses the chemical cues of the frog.

6. Pistol Shrimps Make Gobies their Assistants
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
Whereas Pistol shrimps are known for having the ability of snapping their claws rapidly to ward off predatory fish, their eyesight is considerably limited, especially when compared to the good eyesight of the Gobey fish. In order to take advantage of this, the Pistol shrimps remain in constant contact with the tail fin of the Gobey fish, which signals the shrimp to retreat in the case of predators coming closer, and the fish joins. The shrimp compensates for this kind gesture by allowing the fish use its shelter to rest at night.

7. CIA-Trained Ravens Aid Humans in Spying
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
After the I.Q. Zoo trained chickens to play baseball and pigs to play the piano, it wasn't so difficult to train a raven on espionage research. Testing proved that ravens can actually make brilliant spies. They have been trained to do specific tasks associated to this, such as taking pictures with a special camera fitted onto its beak. This was made possible by directing the bird to a window using a laser pointer and training them to press the little spy camera against a window. The ravens' intelligence took them further in training, where they eventually learnt to open file drawers and carry folders.

8. Moray Eel and Grouper Share their Prey
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
Despite the difference in their size, the moray eel very often lends some help to the grouper fish, which is less capable of squeezing through crevices to get its prey. When it is not possible for the grouper to do this, it swims to the moray's den and shakes its head to draw its attention. In response to this, the moray comes out and follows the grouper to wherever the prey is hiding. The moray kills the prey, which it sometimes eats itself and other times gives to the grouper.

9. Meat Ants Give Caterpillars the Royal Treatment
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
Meat ants are known to control their territory incredibly well by fiercely patrolling the boundaries, which other meat ants wouldn't dare cross unless they want to be kicked out by their hind legs. These ants can even release foul-smelling chemicals to keep animals out of their territory, and of course, swarm and kill the animal if it suits their appetite. However, they don't do this to certain species of caterpillars, which can turn out to be beneficial to them. The caterpillars can secrete sugary fluids that the ants consume, and in turn are protected by the ants from their predators. 

10. A Killer Whale Helps Human Whalers Do their Job
10 Amazing Acts of Animal Cooperation
During the 1860s, the Davidson family was running an established whaling station on the shores of Twofold Bay in Australia. Every year, they would spot a pod of orcas, which they at first feared would interfere with the whales in the station. On the contrary, the leader orca of the pod, which became known as Old Tom, would drive baleen whales into Twofold Bay and trap them there. He would even let the whalers know about this by jumping and slapping the water with its tail. It has also been said that the orcas even protected the whalers out at sea from sharks. After the whales were killed and left in the water overnight, Old Tom and his pod would feed on the lips and tongues of the dead whales.

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